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Micro:Pi - Activities for the Classroom

March 14, 2019

 

Happy Pi Day 2019!

 

This year we are bringing you four activities that you can use in your classroom to learn all about Pi while also coding with the micro:bit!


 

Flashing Pi

 

Using the micro:bit, add the code from the video. When running, the micro:bit will turn the LEDs on to show the Pi symbol for .2 seconds, and then turn off all of the LEDs for .2 seconds.  Since all of the code is inside the forever block, as long as the micro:bit is turned on, the code/flashing Pi will be displayed.

 

Check out the video below for the code and to see it in action!
 

 

 

Pi to the 100th Decimal

 

For this activity, we found Pi to the 100th decimal, and ran a code so when button B is pressed, it will show. Just for fun, we also have the Pi symbol appear when you press button A.

 

Pi to the 100th decimal

3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974945923078164 062862089986280348253421170679

 

Check out the video below to see scrolling Pi!


 

 

 

MicroPi Calculator

 

What better way to learn all about Pi than to use a micro:bit?  For this activity, we coded the micro:bit to show the formula for Pi when button B is pressed.  Since the Pi formula is circumference divided by diameter, the micro:bit will show "C / D" when button B is pressed.

 

Next, in order to calculate Pi, students will enter the value for "C" and "D" in the formula.  When you press button A, the quotient will appear. If the values for the circumference and diameter are correct (meaning it was a perfect circle), the number "3.14" will appear on the micro:bit.  The micro:bit automatically rounds to the hundredths place, so even if there should be multiple decimals, only 3.14 will show.

 

Check out the video below to see it in action!


 

 


MicroPi Calculator +

 

So now that you have learned how to calculate Pi using the micro:bit, why not step it up a notch?  In this activity, if the circumference and diameter are correct (meaning that when divided, they equal Pi), the Pi symbol will appear.  However, if they are incorrect, a sad face will appear.

 

In order to do this, we will need to use a variable (Pi) that will equal the circumference divided by the diameter.  If the variable is equal to or greater than 3.14 and less than 3.15, the Pi symbol will appear. However, if the number does not fall within those numbers, a sad face will appear.  

 

For an easy way to find the circumference and diameter, check out this Circle Calculator

 

Watch the video below for the code and to see it in action!

 

 

Although you can code and play with virtual micro:bits on their website here, it's much for fun with the real thing. So why not check out our class set of micro:bits and get free lessons with your classroom kit!


 

Stay up to date with the latest Aquila blog by following us @aquilaeducation

 

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